Book Review

Beyond The Yew Tree – Rachel Walkley

Today I join the blog tour for Beyond The Yew Tree by Rachel Walkley. Many thanks to Rachel, and to Rachel Gilbey at Rachel’s Random Resources, for inviting me to take part in this tour, and for providing me with a copy of the book.

BLURB:

Whispers in the courtroom.

Only one juror hears them.

Can Laura unravel the truth by the end of the trial?

In an old courtroom, a hissing voice distracts shy juror, Laura, and at night recurring nightmares transport her to a Victorian gaol and the company of a wretched woman.

Although burdened by her own secret guilt, and struggling to form meaningful relationships, Laura isn’t one to give up easily when faced with an extraordinary situation.

The child-like whispers lead Laura to an old prison graveyard, where she teams up with enthusiastic museum curator, Sean. He believes a missing manuscript is the key to understanding her haunting dreams. But nobody knows if it actually exists.

Laura is confronted with the fate of two people – the man in the dock accused of defrauding a charity for the blind, and the restless spirit of a woman hanged over a century ago for murder. If Sean is the companion she needs in her life, will he believe her when she realises that the two mysteries are converging around a long-forgotten child who only Laura can hear?

Ordinary women.

Extraordinary experiences.

PURCHASE LINKS:

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Goodreads

Beyond the Yew Tree_eb

REVIEW:

I have a fondness for books with dual timelines, and Beyond the Yew Tree has only added to that.

As always with dual timelines, no matter how much I enjoy the modern parts of the story, it is always the slow unravelling of long forgotten stories and secrets that really capture my imagination. Emma’s tale, however tragic, was fascinating, and offered an insight into the history of a communication method that I had previously never considered, but now am interested to find out more about.

Whilst I will confess to finding the details of the trial and Laura’s experiences as a juror a little less intriguing than the rest of the book, it was touching watching Laura grow as she was pushed out of her comfort zone in every way imaginable. The subtle changes that she goes through amalgamate to create a character who seems much more comfortable in her own skin by the end of the book than she does at the beginning.

As the court case and Laura’s nightmares developed, I loved the delicate way that the puzzle pieces slipped into place, aided by chapters from history, to slowly form a full picture. The resolution, although it did not come as a complete surprise to me, was beautifully developed, and really rather touching.

Beyond the Yew Tree is an enjoyable read that has left me wanting to explore Lincoln’s historic sites for myself.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Beyond The Yew Tree Author PhotoAspiring writer who pens Women’s Fiction and magical tales about family secrets.

What else?

An East Anglian turned Northerner – almost.

Information professional, always.

Biologist, in my memories.

Archivist, when required.

Amateur pianist and flautist.

Reluctant gardener.

Scribbler of pictures.

And forever…. a mother and wife.

Oh, not forgetting, cat lover!

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GIVEAWAY:

Win One copy of The Last Thing She Said or The Woman of Heachley Hall (Open INT)

  • If the winner is in the UK then it will be a print copy, otherwise International winner is e-book.

Terms and Conditions –Worldwide entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter link below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data.  I am not responsible for dispatch or delivery of the prize.

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Book Review

Esme’s Wish – Elizabeth Foster

Today I am joining the blog tour for Esme’s Wish, the Middle Grade/YA magical realism book by Elizabeth Foster. Many thanks to Elizabeth, and to Rachel at Rachel’s Random Resources, for inviting me to be a part of the tour, and for providing me with a copy of the book.

BLURB:

A warm-hearted, whimsical fantasy tale, with lashings of mystery, magic, and mythology, and prose that ‘flows like water.’ Prepare to fall in love with Esperance! 

 When fifteen-year-old Esme Silver objects at her father’s wedding, her protest is dismissed as the action of a stubborn, selfish teenager. Everyone else has accepted the loss of Esme’s mother, Ariane – so why can’t she?
 
But Esme is suspicious. She is sure that others are covering up the real reason for her mother’s disappearance – that ‘lost at sea’ is code for something more terrible, something she has a right to know.
 
After Esme is accidentally swept into the enchanted world of Aeolia, the truth begins to unfold. With her newfound friends, Daniel and Lillian, Esme retraces her mother’s steps in the glittering canal city of Esperance, untangling the threads of Ariane’s double life. But the more Esme discovers about Ariane, the more she questions whether she really knew her at all.

“A fresh new fantasy, of an enchanting world.” – Wendy Orr, New York Times best selling author of Nim’s Island.

 This inventive tale, the first in an MG-to-YA series, is an ideal read for 10-14 year olds.

Esme’s Wish recently won first place in the fantasy category of the 2018 Purple Dragonfly Book Awards, which recognises excellence in children’s literature.

Esme's Wish cover[2]

PURCHASE LINKS:

Amazon UK

Amazon US

REVIEW:

Mythical creatures, magical powers, a search for a lost love one and a mission to save a strange world – these are all the things that, in my opinion, are vital for a good fantasy adventure, and Esme’s Wish has these by the bucket load.

From page one, I was drawn to Esme and the pain she was feeling watching her father remarry. Even though I am fortunate in the fact that this is not something I have experienced, I believe this is something that will resonate with a lot of young readers. Add to this Esme’s isolation, both physical and emotional, and you have a heroine who it is impossible not to fall for. Whilst the lighthouse keeper’s cottage sounds like my idea of heaven, I can imaging that as a teenager I would have found it very lonely.

Elizabeth Foster’s description of the remote point where Esme lived, and the deserted island of Spindrift are so atmospheric that as I was reading about them, I couldn’t think of anywhere I would rather visit – that is, until I encountered Esperance. Even though it has it’s troubles, the community was so warm and welcoming, and the town itself so full of wonder, it made me wish this was somewhere I could visit myself. It was just everything that had been missing from Esme’s life since her mother’s disappearance, and it really warmed the heart.

The adventure and mystery that unfolded throughout the book was perfectly paced to keep you reading, but still have time to appreciate all the new sights and sounds, and enjoy the discovery of new creatures. The different levels of adventure and exploration mean this is a book that can be enjoyed by all ages. Personally I can’t wait to visit Esperance again in the next book.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

A-Elizabeth Foster Hi Res 06 (1)I read avidly as a child, but only discovered the joys of writing some years ago when reading to my own kids reminded me how much I missed getting lost in other worlds. It’s never too late to find and follow your passion! I now have two books published and am about to start writing the third and final story in the Esme series.  My home base is Sydney, where I can often be found running (just kidding – walking) by the water, or scribbling in cafés.

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Win 3 x pairs of e-books Esme’s Wish & Esme’s Gift (Open Internationally)

*Terms and Conditions –Worldwide entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter link below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data.  I am not responsible for dispatch or delivery of the prize.

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Book Review

The Night Country – Melissa Albert

Today I am review The Night Country by Melissa Albert. My thanks to Melissa, and to Penguin Random House, for providing me with a copy of the book which I received via NetGalley.

BLURB:

Alice has fought hard for a normal life. Having escaped the Hinterland – the strange, pitch-dark fairy tale world she was born into – she has washed up in New York City, determined to build a new future for herself.

But when her fellow survivors start being brutally murdered, Alice must face the fact that the Hinterland cannot be so easily escaped, and that, from the shadows of her past, something – or someone – is coming for her . . .

THE HIGHLY ANTICIPATED SEQUEL TO INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLING NOVEL THE HAZEL WOOD

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REVIEW:

I hadn’t realised just how much The Hazel Wood had stayed with me until I picked up The Night Country and was instantly sucked back in. All the sinister feelings The Hazel Wood had generated came flooding back before anything had even happened. The Stories that resided in the Hinterland were terrifying enough when they stayed where the belonged, but to discover that the very worst of the ex-Stories had followed Alice back to the human realm was a truly horrifying thought.

I enjoyed the “whodunit” element to Alice’s story – this is something that you don’t often see in YA fantasy, and it added an unusual twist. It was Finch’s story that I truly loved in this book though. The telling of it had an almost fairy tale style to it, and even as the Hinterland unravelled around him, it retained a certain innocence that wasn’t present in Alice’s dark and twisty life. The mirrored styles of each of their stories enhanced each other and balanced the book beautifully. Everything around Finch’s adventures, from using books as doors to other worlds, to the way he communicates with Alice was just filled with wonder.

As the story built towards its climax, my heart was in my throat as I couldn’t see any way there was going to be the happy ending I longed for. Did I get my happily ever after, or did they all die in the end? You’ll just have to read it to find out.

The Night Country really is a satisfying sequel to a book that made my Top Ten of books I read in 2019, and I have a suspicion that it could be making its own appearance in this years Top Ten.

Book Review

Victory Day – Rachel Churcher

I’m a little sad today as I join the blog tour for the fifth and final book in the Battle Ground series. Many thanks to Rachel Churcher, and to Rachel Gilbey at Rachel’s Random Resources, for inviting me to take part in this tour, and for providing me with a copy of the book.

BLURB:

Bex Ellman and Ketty Smith meet in London. As the war heats up around them, Bex and Ketty must learn to trust each other. With her friends and family in danger, Bex needs Ketty to help rescue them. For Ketty, working with Bex is a matter of survival. When Victory is declared, both will be held accountable for their decisions.

The Battle Ground series is set in a dystopian near-future UK, after Brexit and Scottish independence.

Victory Day Cover

PURCHASE LINKS:

Purchase here

REVIEW:

You’ve probably all realised by now that I have loved every second of this series so far, and Victory Day really was no exception. Although reading it was a bitter sweet experience, as it always is when you reach the end of a favourite series, this book really is a fitting ending and provides an extremely satisfying conclusion.

As the conflict between the resistance and the Home Forces reaches fever pitch, emotions are running high on both sides of the battle lines. The short chapters in this book, bouncing back and forth between Bex and Ketty,  create an incredibly fast-paced book, and ensure that you are on the edge of your seat throughout.

Seeing Ketty set adrift as her world collapses around her and she finds herself completely isolated as she fights for her own survival was heartbreaking. As all the awful things that she has done throughout the conflict are recounted, I found that I desperately wanted to hate her, but I just couldn’t. As much as she probably would have hated it, I just wanted to give her a big hug. It came as a total surprise to me, but she has become my favourite character across the whole series.

As I was reading I found myself see-sawing between how I wanted things to end between Bex and Ketty. On some level, I wanted them to make their peace and end up as allies, but on another, that just felt a bit too sickly, and that part of me wanted them to end the book as they started, firmly on opposite sides. I’m not going to say how things actually ended up, but I will say that it felt right.

Victory DAy was a suitably dramatic conclusion to the Battle Ground series, and I am very much looking forward to seeing what comes next from Rachel Churcher.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Rachel Churcher Author photoRachel Churcher was born between the last manned moon landing, and the first orbital Space Shuttle mission. She remembers watching the launch of STS-1, and falling in love with space flight, at the age of five. She fell in love with science fiction shortly after that, and in her teens she discovered dystopian fiction. In an effort to find out what she wanted to do with her life, she collected degrees and other qualifications in Geography, Science Fiction Studies, Architectural Technology, Childminding, and Writing for Radio.

She has worked as an editor on national and in-house magazines; as an IT trainer; and as a freelance writer and artist. She has renovated several properties, and has plenty of horror stories to tell about dangerous electrics and nightmare plumbers. She enjoys reading, travelling, stargazing, and eating good food with good friends – but nothing makes her as happy as writing fiction.

Her first published short story appeared in an anthology in 2014, and the Battle Ground series is her first long-form work. Rachel lives in East Anglia, in a house with a large library and a conservatory full of house plants. She would love to live on Mars, but only if she’s allowed to bring her books.

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Book Review

Monkey Arkwright – Rob Campbell

As part of my YA double bill today I am joining the blog tour for the YA mystery, Monkey Arkwright, by Rob Campbell. Many thanks to Rob, and to Rachel at Rachel’s Random Resources, for inviting me to take part in the tour, and for providing me with a copy of the book.

BLURB:

Budding writer Lorna Bryson is struggling to come to terms with the recent death of her father when she meets Monkey Arkwright, the boy who loves to climb. The two strike up an immediate rapport, and Monkey challenges her to write about him, claiming that he can show her things that are worth writing about.

True to his word, Lorna is catapulted into Monkey’s world of climbing and other adventures in the churches, woodlands and abandoned places in and around their home town of Culverton Beck.

When the two teenagers find an ancient coin in the woods, claims from potential owners soon flood in, including the mysterious Charles Gooch, who is adamant that the coin is his. But this is only the opening act in a much larger mystery that has its roots in some dark deeds that took place more than a century earlier.

Combining their talents, Lorna and Monkey set about fitting the pieces together in a tale of budding friendship, train-obsessed simpletons, the shadow of Napoleon and falling pianos.

Monkey Arkwright Cover

PURCHASE LINKS:

Amazon UK

Amazon US

REVIEW:

After going through a spate of darker novels towards the end of 2019, Monkey Arkwright was just the book I needed to lighten the mood as I entered the new decade. For me, it was love at first sight with the eponymous hero of the book. Monkey is such a quirky little character with his love of climbing and apparent lust for life that it was impossible to resist his charms from the instant he appeared in the book. There is more to Monkey than meets the eye though and I thoroughly enjoyed watching his story unfold.

There was something about the writing style of this book, and the story itself, that put me in mind of the old black and white film noir genre. The mystery of the strange coin, and the even stranger people who tried to collect it, combined with decades old legends surrounding lucky artefacts, together with some of the language used both in the narrative, and by our heroine Lorna, made this almost feel like it was a book from another time. At the same time, it is also a charming coming of age tale as Lorna and Monkey learn more about each other and themselves, and what they are capable of.

Although the book does take a slightly darker turn from around the halfway point as Lorna and Monkey become more involved with the mysterious Lester Hawkstone, it somehow retains a feel of innocence and the old school adventure stories I grew up with. I think as the series progresses it has the potential to develop into something more sinister, but in a way I hope it doesn’t, as to me the innocence of the story reflects Monkey and his attitude to life. Either way, I am looking forward to reading the next book in the series.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Rob Campbell - AuthorPhotoRob Campbell was born in the blue half of Manchester.

He studied Electrical & Electronic Engineering at Manchester Polytechnic, gaining an honours degree, but the fact that he got a U in his Chemistry O-Level helps to keep him grounded.

Having had a belly full of capacitors and banana plugs, on graduation he transferred his skills to software engineering. He still writes code by day, but now he writes novels by night. Listing his pastimes in no particular order, he loves music, reading and holidays, but he is partial to the words and music of Bruce Springsteen.

His favourite authors are David Morrell, Joe Abercrombie, Scott Lynch & Carlos Ruiz Zafón.

He lives in Manchester with his wife and two daughters.

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Book Review

Are You Watching – Ralph Vincent

Today finds me joining the blog tour for the YA mystery novel, Are You Watching, by Ralph Vincent. Many thanks to Ralph, Penguin Random House UK, and to Anne Cater at Random Things Blog Tours, for inviting me to take part in the tour, and for providing me with a copy of the book.

BLURB:

A page-turning new YA thriller for the social media age, perfect for fans of A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder and One Of Us Is Lying.

Ten years ago, Jess’s mother was murdered by the Magpie Man.

She was the first of his victims but not the last.

Now Jess is the star of a YouTube reality series and she’s using it to catch the killer once and for all.

The whole world is watching her every move.

And so is the Magpie Man.

Are You Watching Cover

PURCHASE LINKS:

Get Are You Watching? in ebook now for only 99p – https://amzn.to/34J8Qsi

REVIEW:

Being a fan of One of Us is Lying by Karen M. McManus, when I saw the comparison between that book and this one, I jumped at the chance to take part in this blog tour, and I wasn’t disappointed.

In the Q&A at the back of the book Vincent Ralph says that he views each chapter of a book as a scene from a film, and this is something that definitely comes through in his writing style. Each chapter is short and snappy, creating a fast pace and a real feeling of tension. Of course it does also make it easy to fall into the, “Just one more chapter,” trap and before you know it, it is three o clock in the morning and you have finished the book. I know chapter length is something that readers have varying opinions on, and whilst I don’t really have a personal preference, I am aware that some people are not fans of the very short chapter. However, I would encourage these people to pick up Are You Watching? and give it a try, because, in my opinion, this style works perfectly for this book. Rooted as the story is in social media, the short, sharp chapters put me in mind of the posts you see on social media, and it reads almost as a stream of consciousness, or a Twitter thread, rather than a carefully thought out story.

Aside from the, “Just one more chapter,” issue, this book kept me reading into the wee small hours partly because I couldn’t wait to find out what was going to happen next, but also partly because I started reading it at night and managed to freak myself out with thoughts of someone watching me, much as Jess’s YouTube viewers were watching her. Just the thought that her mother’s killer could be watching her every move really got under my skin.

As much as the thriller elements, the mystery, the intrigue, in this book kept me reading, it was the underlying story that really hooked me in. Yes, I wanted to know who the killer was and if Jess’s plan to catch him worked, but what will stay with me is the raw emotion of a family torn apart by grief and a young girl struggling to cope with the loss of a mother she never had the chance to really know. From the blurb, I didn’t expect a book that would be so heartbreaking and poignant, and it really touched me. I will be watching for what comes next from Ralph Vincent, that is for sure.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Vincent Ralph Author picVincent Ralph has been writing in one form or another since his teens and always dreamed of being a novelist. He owes his love of books to his mother, who encouraged his imagination from an early age and made sure there were new stories to read.

Vincent has lived in London, Cornwall and Chester but he now lives in his home county of Kent with his wife, son and two cats.

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Guest Posts

A Song For Bill Robinson – C.E. Atkins

I am joining the blog tour for A Song For Bill Robinson today, and I am pleased to be welcoming the author, Chantelle Atkins to my blog to tell us all about the inspiration behind her books. I’ll hand you over to Chantelle now, and tell you all about A Song For Bill Robinson further down.

A Song Auhotr‘Where do you get your inspiration from,’ is probably one of the most common questions a writer gets asked, and it’s not always an easy one to answer. Sometimes I’m not exactly sure where the idea for a story came from. Sometimes it’s one of those wonderful eureka moments, and sometimes it’s much more of a slow burn, of ideas and characters emerging and blending together over time. To celebrate the release of my YA novel A Song For Bill Robinson I thought it might be appropriate to take a stroll back in time and revisit each of my books and what inspired me to write them. The books are listed below in order of publication.

The Mess Of Me

When I started writing again after a decade off neglecting it, I started with The Boy With The Thorn In His Side, mainly because I knew I just had to get this book finally done. As I was writing it again, I started to get ideas for other books. It’s very true what they say; the more you write, the more you want to write. It was like a torrent of thoughts, ideas, characters and dialogue started filling my head. I knew I wanted to write a book close to my heart, one which mostly mirrored things I had been through myself. All of my other books have pieces of me in them, it’s unavoidable I find, but The Mess of Me is probably the book closest to the real me. Lou Carling, the main character, is a stroppier, feistier version of me as a teen. Her struggles with body image and eating were exactly mine. I was able to let rip in this book. I was able to voice thoughts and feelings I’d had for years through Lou. Her character and her experiences in this book were very much drawn from a personal struggle, but the plot was inspired by something else. When I was a kid my mum had a friend with five boisterous sons. She was a typical matriarch and ruled her roost with a rod of iron and plenty of tough love. We were all terrified of her. In the book, Lou’s best friend is Joe and his mother Lorraine was modelled on this woman. The younger boys were our friends but the older boys were unknown to us. To them, we were annoying little kids to be ignored. To us, they were mysterious, even exotic teenage lads we wanted to emulate. I can remember watching for clues of them and their lives. They were part of my life, yet I never really knew them at all, and that was partly the inspiration behind the plot in The Mess Of Me. Joe’s shady older brothers and the lives they lead which Lou and Joe become mixed up in.

The Boy With The Thorn In His Side – series

I first wrote the early version of this book when I was twelve. I’d already been writing stories for a few years and wanted to be a writer when I grew up. My previous stories had been inspired by books like Watership Down, so were all about lost or abandoned animals. At aged twelve, however, I was getting into darker stuff like Stephen King and watching a lot of horror movies. I remember watching The Lost Boys for the first time, and apart from falling in love with the actor Corey Haim, I had a big idea moment. You know the part where everyone realises that the mother’s new boyfriend is actually the head vampire? I started thinking, what if? What if your mother had a boyfriend in real life, who was a real monster, a human monster, twisted and cruel and no one believed you? What would you do? How would you fight them? Would you fight or escape? Who would you tell? At this time in my life my parents had divorced and had both started seeing other people, so I think this was playing on my mind when I started writing the book. It was the first book I ever wrote of a decent length and I fell in love with writing forever. It became my obsession. Those characters stayed with me for decades, talking in my head every night and telling me what happened next! The book was rewritten and published in 2013, and since then it has been developed into what will be a six-book series.

This Is Nowhere

This was one of my books that started with the character. I was reading a lot about Kurt Cobain around this time and listening to Nirvana again, as I had in my youth. Reading about his stomach problems and constant pain, created a character in my head, one that had similar, mysterious ailments, and a father he did not get along with. The plot took a while to develop. I had the characters and the family dynamics first. But eventually I had the plot too. A young man who has nearly always questioned the point of his own existence, is called back to the village he ran from as a teenager, as his elderly father has dementia and this older sister wants him to grow up and come back. But he also goes back for his own reasons; to find out what really happened to his beloved mother who vanished without trace in 1996.

Bird People and Other Stories

The idea for this book came from another writer who suggested short stories related to novels might be a fun way to promote books. I immediately got loads of ideas and therefore, most of the stories in this collection are inspired by or related to my published novels.

The Tree Of Rebels

This was one of those rare times when the idea came before the character. A few years back, I kept seeing posts about Monsanto on my Facebook feed, and I read a few articles about the owning and patenting of seeds and crops. My mind started coming up with ‘what if’ scenarios and before I knew it I had a YA dystopian set in the future on my hands. This book was hard to write because the plot came first, which is unusual for me, and because it was a futuristic dystopian which was quite far out of my comfort zone! There is a sequel planned though.

Elliot Pie’s Guide To Human Nature

This book idea was very annoying as it arrived when I was in the middle of The Tree Of Rebels. I suddenly got this new and unwanted idea and set of characters, who would just not go away. Because I was struggling with The Tree Of Rebels, it was very tempting to jump ship from that one and focus on Elliot Pie, but I managed to hold him off. His character came to me first and was very much a reflection of my own thoughts and fears at this time. Wondering if the world is doomed, if it’s too late to halt climate change, if things would continue to get worse, if people are basically all pretty awful and so on. And trying to remain positive for my children and convince myself and them that people are mostly good and that we need to have hope. Elliot and his mother became the two sides of this argument. Elliot is an optimist, whereas she has given up. The plot about him making friends with strangers to prove a point came along very easily after that.

A Song For Bill Robinson

And finally, my latest release, which is actually the first in a series of three books. When I was around 16, I watched the film The Commitments for the first time and absolutely loved it. I’ve always had a really eclectic taste in music, and films with awesome soundtracks are my favourite. I loved everything about this film, and in usual writerly magpie fashion, I stole a few ideas and went with them. I wanted to write a book about a grumpy teenage boy who loved to sing. And I wanted to build added pressures and problems around that desire; so the character of Bill Robinson has a complicated family life, a local murder to solve and a growing addiction to alcohol. The alcohol storyline was also inspired by the struggle a very close friend of mine has had over the years and she was incredibly kind and helpful helping me get this aspect of the story right. I wrote an early version of the book aged 16 and then forgot about it, until I discovered it in an old suitcase in 2016. I knew right away that I had to rewrite it and publish it. I started with the two short stories you can find in the Bird People collection and then when I had the time, I started the novel. Other storylines emerged by themselves, such as the fight to save the community centre and the love triangle that develops between Bill and his best friends Adam and Summer. As soon as I finished it, I knew there would be a follow up book!

Thank you so much Chantelle, for that wonderful insight into you work. Now, onto the all important details regarding A Song for Bill Robinson.

A songforbillrobinson

BLURB:

Tensions are building on the notorious Holds End estate.

The local community centre is fighting for survival and the murder of 15-year-old Lewis Matthews remains unsolved…

Wannabe teenage singer, Bill Robinson, just got out of hospital after surviving a vicious attack. He thinks he knows who attacked him…and why. When a violent feud escalates between him and local thug Charlie McDonnal, Bill vows to find the killer and help save the community centre by taking part in the local singing contest.

How can music bring a shattered community together? And can Bill keep his own demons at bay long enough to win the singing contest and find out who killed Lewis Matthews?

PURCHASE LINKS:

Amazon UK

Amazon US

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Chantelle Atkins was born and raised in Dorset, England and still resides there now with her husband, four children and multiple pets. She is addicted to reading, writing and music and writes for both the young adult and adult genres. Her fiction is described as gritty, edgy and compelling. Her debut Young Adult novel The Mess Of Me deals with eating disorders, self-harm, fractured families and first love. Her second novel, The Boy With The Thorn In His Side follows the musical journey of a young boy attempting to escape his brutal home life and has now been developed into a 6 book series. She is also the author of This Is Nowhere and award-winning dystopian, The Tree Of Rebels, plus a collection of short stories related to her novels called Bird People and Other Stories. The award-winning Elliot Pie’s Guide To Human Nature was released through Pict Publishing in October 2018. Her next YA novel A Song For Bill Robinson will be released in December 2019. Chantelle has had multiple articles about writing published by Author’s Publish magazine.

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