Meet the Author

Eliza Graham

As part of the blog tour for her latest novel, You Let Me Go, I am joined today by Eliza Graham. Thanks so much to Eliza for agreeing to answer my questions today, and to Rachel Gilbey at Rachel’s Random Resources for inviting me to be a part of the blog tour. Let’s jump straight in to the questions, and then I will tell you everything you need to know about You Let Me Go.

In your author bio, you mention Polish cemeteries and Cornish decoy harbours as some of your less obscure research trips. What are some of the more obscure places your research has taken you? Do you have a favourite place that you have visited in the name of research?

Hi and thanks for having me on the blog! The strangest places I have been to are both in former Yugoslavia. The first we happened upon quite by chance. We (I was on holiday with my husband) were kayaking around some small islands off the Croatian coast. We landed at a small harbour. On a fishing boat a woman perhaps suffering from dementia or some kind of psychosis was shouting at her husband in a very deep, almost demonic tone. He was gutting fish with a very large knife and casting murderous glances at her. We walked away briskly. In front of us was a plaque marking the murder of a large number of prisoners of war during the Second World War. Continuing on, we came across some ghostly looking run-down buildings, which we later found out had been a Communist-era children’s holiday camp. The small island ought to have been breath-taking: the coastline is stunning and the sun was shining. But we were happy to return to the kayak and paddle away. The location stayed in my mind, however, and took root in my book THE LINES WE LEAVE BEHIND.

One of the most delightful places I have been to while researching was the Helford Estuary and its intersection with the top of the Lizard Peninsula on the south coast of Cornwall. We visited in the early summer of 2019 and I was dazzled by the wildflowers and clear light. The book I had planned on writing turned out not to be the book I ended up writing because as I walked from Helford village along the estuary I fell in love with some of the houses and cottages. I decided to create my own imaginary house on an imaginary creek off the Helford, which is Rozenn’s longhouse in my new book YOU LET ME GO.

Although the majority of your books are historical fiction, you have written one YA book, also with a historical setting. Do you have any plans to write more books within this genre?

Not at the moment, although I think I missed a trick and should have written a book about the Blitz for slightly younger children, perhaps 10-11-year-olds. A primary school teachers told me that the period featured on the curriculum. The power of hindsight!

What advice would you give to someone who wanted to write historical fiction?

Research is clearly important and one of the most rewarding parts of choosing a period from the past. It’s easy to pursue small research issues that feel important and insert them into the narrative just to show that you really do know that rationing laws changed at various points during the war, or that a certain bus route used to travel between point A and point B even though it was later suspended. You can end up with a manuscript over stuffed with historical facts that don’t move the narrative on. I think I suffer from neurosis on this point because I had a father who adored spotting inaccuracies in historical novels and television programmes. When my last novel THE TRUTH IN OUR LIES came out he was nearing the end of his life and very weak, but we had a very lively debate about whether or not a particular character would have worn a peaked cap in 1942. (I won that argument because I had a photo on my mobile that proved my point. But Dad usually won.)

When you aren’t writing or heading out on research trips, how do you like to spend your time?

I love evenings spent with friends having a good meal and sitting by the fire for hours to talk. I live near the North Wessex Downs and have access to miles of walks. On a fine, frosty winter morning I love to take my dog out and admire the views. On early summer Sunday evenings we sometimes walk beside the Thames near Lechlade and sit in a pub garden for a reviving glass of something. I’m writing this in January and most of these things aren’t currently allowed so I am hoping that by the time YOU LET ME GO comes out in March, they will be legal again.

What does a writing day look like for you? Do you have a set regime that you like to follow?

I’m not over-prescriptive about exactly how and when I write any more. I don’t always set myself daily word counts, for instance, although sometimes they are very helpful. I found that if I was rigid about reaching a target I was sometimes writing rubbish and it didn’t seem worth it. The only thing that matters is that every day should bring a book a little bit closer to completion. That might just mean a flash of insight into a character’s motivation or improving knowledge of how lifeboats operated in the 1940s. At the moment I’m marking up some early chapters of my work in progress in fountain pen, something I haven’t used for years. I’ve written quite a lot of new material and am fascinated by the way the change of medium is revealing things about the characters.

Increasingly I know I need peace and quiet to work in: when I first started I could write almost anywhere, with children in the room, the radio on, etc. But now I like a quiet room of my own. It doesn’t always have to be my study: it can be a warm sofa with the dog snoozing next to me if that helps the words flow.

You Let me Go - GRAHAM_YOULETMEGO_28121_FT

BLURB:

After her beloved grandmother Rozenn’s death, Morane is heartbroken to learn that her sister is the sole inheritor of the family home in Cornwall—while she herself has been written out of the will. With both her business and her relationship with her sister on the rocks, Morane becomes consumed by one question: what made Rozenn turn her back on her?

When she finds an old letter linking her grandmother to Brittany under German occupation, Morane escapes on the trail of her family’s past. In the coastal village where Rozenn lived in 1941, she uncovers a web of shameful secrets that haunted Rozenn to the end of her days. Was it to protect those she loved that a desperate Rozenn made a heartbreaking decision and changed the course of all their lives forever?

Morane goes in search of the truth but the truth can be painful. Can she make her peace with the past and repair her relationship with her sister?

PURCHASE LINKS:

Amazon UK

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

You Let Me Go - AUthor photo Eliza GrahamEliza Graham’s novels have been long-listed for the UK’s Richard & Judy Summer Book Club in the UK, and short-listed for World Book Day’s ‘Hidden Gem’ competition. She has also been nominated for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction and the Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction.

Her books have been bestsellers both in Europe and the US.

She is fascinated by the world of the 1930s and 1940s: the Second World War and its immediate aftermath and the trickle-down effect on future generations. Consequently she’s made trips to visit bunkers in Brittany, decoy harbours in Cornwall, wartime radio studios in Bedfordshire and cemeteries in Szczecin, Poland. And those are the less obscure research trips.

It was probably inevitable that Eliza would pursue a life of writing. She spent biology lessons reading Jean Plaidy novels behind the textbooks, sitting at the back of the classroom. In English and history lessons she sat right at the front, hanging on to every word. At home she read books while getting dressed and cleaning her teeth. During school holidays she visited the public library multiple times a day.

Eliza lives in an ancient village in the Oxfordshire countryside with her family. Not far from her house there is a large perforated sarsen stone that can apparently summon King Alfred if you blow into it correctly. Eliza has never managed to summon him. Her interests still mainly revolve around reading, but she also enjoys walking in the downland country around her home and travelling around the world to research her novels.

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GIVEAWAY:

Win 3 x Paperback copies of You Let Me Go by Eliza Graham (Open to UK / USA only)

*Terms and Conditions –UK and USA entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter link below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

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Book Review

The Rose Code – Kate Quinn

I am joining the blog tour for historical fiction novel, The Rose Code by Kate Quinn today. Many thanks to Kate for providing me with a copy of the book, and to Anne Cater at Random Things Tours for inviting me to be  a part of the blog tour.

BLURB:

1940. Three very different women answer the call to mysterious country estate Bletchley Park, where the best minds in Britain train to break German military codes.

Vivacious debutante Osla is the girl who has everything – beauty, wealth, and the dashing Prince Philip of Greece sending her roses – but she burns to prove herself as more than a society girl, and puts her fluent German to use as a translator of decoded enemy secrets. Imperious self-made Mab, product of east-end London poverty, works the legendary codebreaking machines as she conceals old wounds and looks for a socially advantageous husband. Awkward local girl Beth, whose shyness conceals a brilliant facility with puzzle beneath her shy exterior.

1947. As the royal wedding of Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip whips post-war Britain into a fever, three friends-turned-enemies are reunited by a mysterious encrypted letter – the key to which lies buried in the long-ago betrayal that destroyed their friendship and left one of them confined to an asylum. A mysterious traitor has emerged from the shadows of their Bletchley Park past, and now Osla, Mab, and Beth must resurrect their old alliance and crack one last code together…

As the nation prepares for the royal wedding they must race against the clock to save one of their own.

PURCHASE LINKS:

Amazon UK

Amazon US

The Rose Code Cover

REVIEW:

I have been interested in Bletchley since visiting almost 12 years ago. Even so, picking up this book the morning after a certain interview, and with the Duke of Edinburgh ill in hospital, it took a while for me to separate real life from this fictional account and become truly absorbed in the story. These current events made me glad I read the author’s note at the end of the book to help me untangle fact from fiction.

Had I been alive during World War II, and if I had been clever enough, Bletchley is where I would have wanted to serve and this novel brings the passion of the people who did so to life. In Osla, Mab and Beth we are faced with three very different young ladies who form the most unlikely of friendships after being billeted in the same house. This friendship combined with the fascinating history of the work carried out under the strictest secrecy at Bletchley Park would have been enough for this book to win me over. The added mystery of the events that ripped these friends apart and led to one being locked in an asylum only added to this and made this a gripping read.

Heart-breaking and inspiring in equal measure, The Rose Code celebrates the hidden heroes of the war in glorious detail, and twines fact and fiction together seamlessly.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Kate Quinn Author PicKate Quinn is a native of southern California. She attended Boston University, where she earned a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Classical Voice. A lifelong history buff, she has written four novels in the Empress of Rome Saga, and two books in the Italian Renaissance detailing the early years of the infamous Borgia clan. All have been translated into multiple languages. She and her husband now live in Maryland with two black dogs names Caesar and Calpurnia.

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Book Review

Miniskirts Are Murder – Des Burkinshaw

Today I join the blog tour for Miniskirts Are Murder, the second in the Porter and The Gliss series by Des Burkinshaw. You can read my review of book one, Dead & Talking, here. Many thanks to Des for providing me with a copy of the book, and to Rachel at Rachel’s Random Resources for inviting me to be a part of the tour.

BLURB:

Porter Norton, his friends and his sarcastic spirit guide, The Gliss, are on the trail of a young actress who went missing in Soho, London, in the Swinging Sixties. Still recovering from their last adventure in the battlefields of WW1, the gang are confronted by a transatlantic conspiracy.

PURCHASE LINKS:

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Miniskirts Front Cover

REVIEW:

Since reading Dead and Talking back in 2019, I have been eagerly awaiting the return of Porter Norton, his spirit guide, The Gliss, and their quirky Scooby gang of Namita, Feng and Karin. I love the different dynamics in play among the group as they continue to get to know each other.

Although Miniskirts Are Murder is the second book in a series, it recaps the events of Dead and Talking sufficiently that it would read well as a standalone, although I think you would be missing out if you didn’t read Dead and Talking as well.

In the historic cases that Porter, somewhat unwillingly, finds himself investigating, Des Burkinshaw isn’t scared to tackle difficult subjects. I don’t want to say too much about the discoveries made in Miniskirts Are Murder because it is hard to do so without giving away the story, but it certainly doesn’t shy away from the seedier side of 1960s Soho. At times, the writing is a little heavy on telling rather than showing, but I think Burkinshaw gets away with it as it means we learn the history as our heroes do, and this is also countered with flashbacks to the scarily naive Ursa, Rose and Bella. Seeing Soho through their eyes really brought it to life for me.

Despite the truly horrific deeds that are uncovered over the course of the book, this still somehow manages to be a fun read, purely because of the wonderful characters that Burkinshaw has created rather than because he has made light of the situation which he most definitely has not. The dry humour that I so enjoyed in the interactions between Porter and his friends, particularly The Gliss, provides a much needed light relief to what would otherwise be very difficult subject matter to digest.

With so many periods of history to explore, and with Porter needing to atone for so much damage caused by his ancestors, this is a series that could run and run, and I really hope it does (I also think it would make a fantastic television series, just in case any TV folk happen to see this!).

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

DES DARKDes, 52, is a former Times journalist/BBC TV producer. Miniskirts are Murder is the second in the Porter and The Gliss Investigations series, following Dead & Talking in 2019. Des likes to live out as much of the stories as possible and spent 3 months in the US researching this novel. He runs a film school in London and has just been commissioned to write a limited season TV series intended for Netflix. He is also a keen musician and through work has jammed with people like Paul McCartney, Brian Wilson and Jeff Lynne. He is married with 1 daughter.

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Guest Posts

Pixeldust – T.K. Arispe

As part of the blog blitz for Pixeldust, I am handing you over to T.K. Arispe today who is sharing their guest post, “When is a villain not a villain?” Many thanks TK for taking the time to talk to everyone, and to Rachel at Rachel’s Random Resources for inviting me to be a part of the blitz.

BLURB:

Maria Elena thought she’d sworn off gaming forever. But she hates her new internship, so her brother Balt convinces her to play Heroes of Avonell, a cutting-edge virtual-reality video game with such complex programming that it’s like the non-player characters are self-aware.

Disappointed with the usual cliché job class offerings, Maria Elena’s character Quinny stumbles through a glitch in the game and ends up in Caed Dhraos, a strange city populated with friendly monsters. Quinny decides to work for the resident dark lord as part of his magic personnel, but she can’t tell anybody she’s playing in off-limits areas of the game—not even Balt. Soon Quinny finds herself getting to the bottom of a mystery surrounding an ancient demon and why Caed Dhraos is suffering from the Blight.

But the artificial intelligences in the game really are self-aware, and some of Avonell’s so-called “heroes” have decided they don’t like humanity very much. The game has gone out of control, and Maria Elena and her new friends have to find a way to set things right. Can she save Avonell – and Earth – while juggling her real job and trying to salvage her crumbling relationship with her brother?

Pixeldust is a dive into a fantastical, fun virtual world where the universe may be made of data, but the dangers, friendships, magic, and lessons learned are very real.

PURCHASE LINKS:

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Pixeldust cover

GUEST POST:

Please note, this guest post contains spoilers for Pixeldust.

Growing up, I never rooted for the villains, but I sure felt sorry for them. So much wasted potential, I thought. I mean, villains are usually powerful and skilled—they have to be, in order to present a satisfying challenge for the heroes. It seemed like such a shame to me to have all of those good qualities go to waste, especially when the villain met their end in the climax of the plot. Or, arguably worse, when the villain was redeemed and then immediately died afterward, because obviously once a character has had a change of heart there are no more directions you can go with them. (cough Darth Vader cough)

Whenever I read a book, watch a movie, or play an RPG, I want everybody to win. I want the heroes to be okay. But I also want the villains to be okay. They need help, too. I always feel that twinge of sadness when I get those experience points for vanquishing someone who could have been a cherished friend and powerful ally.

Those thoughts were swirling around in my head when I drafted the character arc for Lord Zaragoz, the villain who doesn’t know he’s a villain. He doesn’t even know he’s a video game character or that his memories are false. Before he meets Quinny, as far as he’s concerned, he has to protect and provide for his subjects, and he has a hungry demon to appease. If that means invading other kingdoms to steal their pixiedust, so be it. Especially because his people were originally driven out of those kingdoms simply for being different, so there is no love lost there.

At first, Quinny doesn’t know Zaragoz is the villain, either. But when she finds out, she’s devastated—not necessarily for her sake, but for his. By that point he has become a good friend to her, and the last thing she wants is for him to be antagonized by all of the other player characters and the “hero” non-player characters. She is willing to put aside his technical role in the game, and focus on the person he is and the person he could be if he started making better choices.

And Zaragoz, to his credit, believes in himself in the same manner. Upon learning the truth about himself, he rejects his villainous role and tries to make things right, and he ends up becoming one of the heroes of the story when the game’s “actual” heroes make some very unwise and selfish choices and put everyone in danger.

After that, I did not callously dispose of Zaragoz simply because his character arc had wrapped up. He deserved better than that. So I had him use his powerful end-boss magic to make his world real, and he became one of its benevolent rulers. He had proven to everyone that he and his people had just as much place in their world as the “prettier” characters, he had chosen his own path and stuck to his integrity, and he got his just reward for his ultimate heroism.

So Zaragoz is really a stand-in for what I wish I could do for every other villain. Villainy is not a permanent status, but a plot construct. Usually, in order to have a conflict you have to have someone opposite the protagonist driving that conflict. But there are clearly other ways to resolve the conflict than by getting rid of the antagonist. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we lived in a world where everyone was helped rather than hated?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Pixeldust Author very realistic icon versionT.K. Arispe is an illustrator, gamer, and unashamed nerd with a background in animation and webcomic production, including the webcomic Trainer Wants to Fight! which somehow got its own page on TVTropes. She loves interesting stories, well-crafted worlds, and memorable characters, and is passionate about creating quality, intelligent, slightly offbeat media that everyone can enjoy. Most of her story ideas come from random research binges, usually in the fields of theoretical physics, computer science, or oddly enough food history. She lives in California, where she enjoys not having to deal with snow because it is terrifying.

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Meet the Author

Lambert Nagle

As part of the blog tour for Nighthawks, I am delighted to welcome husband and wife writing duo, Lambert Nagle, to my blog so we can all get to know them a little better. Many thanks for taking the time to talk to me, and thanks also to Rachel Gilbey at Rachel’s Random Resources for inviting me to join the tour. Let’s kick off with the questions before I tell everyone all the important details abjut Nighthawks.

Can you tell us a little about yourself?

Thanks for inviting us onto your blog. Lambert Nagle is an author couple and is the pseudonym of Alison Ripley Cubitt and Sean Cubitt. Alison is a multi-genre author and Sean writes academic non-fiction. Nighthawks is our second novel in the Stephen Connor thriller series, following on from the environmental thriller, Revolution Earth. Our stand-alone short story, Contained was published in the collection, Capital Crimes.

What was the inspiration behind your collaboration and which co-writers inspired you?

We were browsing at an airport bookstore and came across a Nicci French book and realised that it was a thriller written by two people. And we looked at each other and said, we could do that: why don’t we try it and see what happens? I started researching other crime and thriller writing duos and discovered that there was a historical precedent—the Martin Beck novels, which were adapted into a gripping Scandi-noir TV series, was the work of another writing couple, Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahloo. They were writing back in the 1960s and were the first to put Scandi-noir fiction on the map. They were at the forefront of the genre and must have influenced a new generation of crime and thriller authors who came after them such as Stieg Larsson and Henning Mankell.

Why do you think that the crime and thriller genre suits collaborators?

We write novels with a large cast of characters and a complex main plot; we weave several subplots through the narrative. That’s a huge undertaking, and when it gets complicated, you really need someone else to bounce ideas off. So much of writing in these genres is problem-solving. And an added bonus is that writing no longer becomes quite such a lonely occupation when you work with someone else.

How do you share the workload? Who does what?

We each play to our strengths. Mine are characterisation, storytelling and structure, while Sean is a better prose stylist than me and writes the detail and the descriptions required for the story world. He’s also a better editor! Before we start, we collaborate on an outline, a structure, the main character arc and the key elements of the plot. Only when we have that do we write.

What were the challenges of collaboration you had to overcome? 

When we first started out, we hadn’t any actual idea about how to go about writing a novel as my background was film and TV and Sean’s non-fiction and academia. Sean took the lead on the first few chapters and I took on the role of editor. We sent out the first draft to an agent who told us to ditch writing a literary fiction thriller and to aim for something more commercial. We had to give up the notion of a single authorial voice and had to learn to write seamlessly, so that readers couldn’t tell that it was two authors.

Nighthawks Cover

BLURB:

When art, money and power collide…
A Mafia boss addicted to beautiful art. A Catholic priest who knows too much. A modern-day Jay Gatsby.
And a woman on the run.

Disgraced London detective Stephen Connor is given an ultimatum: take a transfer to Rome or kiss his career goodbye.
With his love life in tatters and his confidence at an all-time low, can Stephen find the world’s most valuable painting before it disappears forever?

PURCHASE LINKS:

Order here

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Nighthawks Lambert Nagle author photo

Lambert Nagle is the pen-name for Alison Ripley Cubitt and Sean Cubitt, co-writers of international thrillers, mystery and crime. Alison is a former television production executive who worked for Walt Disney and the BBC before pivoting to become a multi-genre author and screenwriter. Her short film drama Waves (with Maciek Pisarek) won the Special Jury Prize, Worldfest, Houston. Sean’s day job is Professor of Film and Television, University of Melbourne, Australia. He writes about film and media for leading academic publishers.

Other titles by Lambert Nagle include Revolution Earth (featuring detective Stephen Connor) and Contained in Capital Crimes, a short story collection from members of ITW (International Thriller Writers) with a foreword by Peter James.

With six passports between them, they set their books in the far-away places they live and work.

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Uncategorized

All My Lies Cover Reveal

I am delighted to be taking part in the cover reveal for Sophie Flynn’s novel, All My Lies. Before I share the cover though, here come all the important details.

BLURB:

Anna wants to escape.
She doesn’t know when her marriage to James began to feel like a trap or when he became so controlling. All she knows is that she needs to leave before it’s too late.

And she has a plan.
When Anna reconnects with her childhood sweetheart, Sam, she sees it as the answer to her problems. Finally, they’ll have a life together, like they’d always planned – the life she was meant to have.

But the lies are catching up with her . . .

On the morning of their escape, Sam goes missing. Anna knows he wouldn’t leave her, that something must have happened to him.
Her search for answers will force her to confront her past, something that she has been running from for a very long time . . .

Perfect for fans of Louise Jensen, Phoebe Morgan and K.L. Slater, this is a twisty, tense psychological thriller about one woman’s hunt for the truth and her ultimate fight to break free.

PURCHASE LINKS:

Amazon

Simon & Schuster

Sounds great doesn’t it! Now, here comes the cover!

All My Lies - announcement Square

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Sophie_Flynn_AuthorSophie is a Cotswolds based psychological thriller author with an MA in Creative Writing from Oxford Brookes. Her debut novel ALL MY LIES will be published by Simon & Schuster on April 23, 2021.

Alongside writing, Sophie is the Head of Marketing at Jericho Writers. After being awarded a place at Swanwick Writers’ Summer School on the TopWrite scheme for young writers in 2017, Sophie began writing short fiction. She has since had many stories published and placed in competitions with organisations such as Writing Magazine and The Cheltenham Literature Festival.

When not writing, Sophie can be mostly found on muddy walks with her husband and rescue dog or disappearing to Cornwall whenever possible.

She is represented by Kate Nash of Kate Nash Literary Agency.

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Book Review

Dragonfly Girl – Marti Leimbach

I am joining the blog tour for Dragonfly Girl by Marti Leimbach today. Many thanks to Marti, and Katherine Tegen Books for providing me with a copy of the book, and to Anne Cater at Random Things Tours for inviting me to take part.

BLURB:

In this spellbinding thriller and YA debut from bestselling author Marti Leimbach, Kira Adams has discovered a cure for deathand it may just cost her life.

Things aren’t going well for Kira. At home, she cares for her mother and fends off debt collectors. At school, she’s awkward and shy. Plus, she may flunk out if she doesn’t stop obsessing about science, her passion and the one thing she’s good at . . . very good at.

When she wins a prestigious science contest she draws the attention of the celebrated professor Dr. Gregory Munn (as well as his handsome assistant), leading to a part-time job in a top-secret laboratory.

The job is mostly cleaning floors and equipment, but one night, while running her own experiment, she revives a lab rat that has died in her care.

One minute it is dead, the next it is not.

Suddenly she’s the remarkable wunderkind, the girl who can bring back the dead. Everything is going her way. But it turns out that science can be a dangerous business, and Kira is swept up into a world of international rivalry with dark forces that threaten her life.

PURCHASE LINKS:

Amazon UK

Dragonfly Girl cover

REVIEW:

Dragonfly Girl is a fascinating book exploring scientific discovery that to my very unscientific brain seemed beyond the realms of possibility. The idea of being able to bring something previously dead back to life planted this book firmly in the sci-fi genre in my mind. Imagine my surprise then when, halfway through this book, I stumbled across a news story about doctors successfully transplanting hearts that had effectively died into teenage patients. This blew my mind, and made me read parts of this book through very different eyes. 

Although it is pretty heavy on the complex science at times, I still found this book an easy read and my lack of understanding of the intricacies of the science didn’t detract from my enjoyment of the larger story. Whilst I wasn’t, for reasons I can’t quite pinpoint, overly keen on Kira herself, I loved the quirky supporting cast of characters, particularly poor, damaged Dimitry and rat-loving April.

Dragonfly Girl is a fast-paced YA thriller that sucks you in from the very start and leaves you wanting more at the end. I hope it won’t be too long before we see a sequel being published.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Marti Leimbach Author picMarti Leimbach’s latest novel is DRAGONFLY GIRL, a YA action/thriller about a high school girl with a gift for science who discovers a “cure” for death and ends up embroiled in an international rivalry. It is published by Harper Collins in February 2021.

Marti Leimbach is known for her bestsellers, Dying Young, made into a film starring Julia Roberts, and Daniel Isn’t Talking. She is interested in neurodiversity and has shared the stage with young inventors at the Human Genome Project (Toronto), the National Autistic Society, and the University of Oxford.

She teaches on the Masters Programme in Creative Writing at the University of Oxford. Dragonfly Girl is her eighth novel, but her first for young adults.

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